God’s Funny Valentine

Posted: February 14, 2019 in Uncategorized

Happy Valentine’s Day! As we celebrate this day of love, I can’t help but think about God who showed us love in a very vulnerable and personal way by giving up everything to be with us. I think of Jesus as God’s funny valentine to the world.

A couple of year’s ago I had some fun with the kids in our church playing Jesus Loves Me in all sorts of different ways, including to We Will Rock You. I share it today as my funny valentine to all of you!

Love,
Mark

WOULD YOU RECOGNIZE JESUS IF HE STOOD UP IN WORSHIP, READ SCRIPTURE, AND PREACHED RIGHT IN FRONT OF YOU? Well, guess what? Jesus did exactly that yet the people in his own hometown didn’t recognize him for who he truly was.

If you’re having a hard time spotting the truth these days, or feeling the presence of God in your life, or even experiencing the promised miracles of God, don’t despair.  Read the rest of this entry »

READING JOHN’S GOSPEL CAN BE A LITTLE LIKE ANALYZING A DREAM! Each element seems to hold many different meanings. Take the Wedding at Cana, for example. Read the rest of this entry »

LET’S ADMIT IT. WE MAINLINE PROTESTANTS GET DOWNRIGHT SQUEAMISH WHEN ASK US IF WE’RE BAPTIZED IN THE HOLY SPIRIT OR FIRE! We tend to leave that kind of Spirit and fire business to our peppy Pentecostal siblings and their speaking in tongues, or to our quirky Charismatic cousins and their rolling in the aisles. No siree Bob Jones! A baptism of Spirit and fire just isn’t a part of our party line.

Baptism for us mainliners tends to be all about water. We have peace like river, joy like fountain, and love like an ocean but that Spirit and fire talk has been a bit of stumbling block for us forward thinking, Princeton University founding, academic loving, progressive Presbyterians and mainline Protestants.

Well listen up! That locust-breath, desert-dwelling prophet John the Baptist says baptism with Spirit and fire is what Jesus brings. “I baptize you with water,” says John,  “but one who is more powerful than I is coming . . . He will baptize you” en pnuemati agio kai puri – “with the Holy Spirit and purifying fire.”

Baptism with Spirit and fire is for even us Presbyterians, Methodists and the like, too. Perhaps there’s a way for God’s frozen chosen to get thawed out by God’s fiery Spirit but we just have to think about it in a new way.

Walter Brueggemann, one of the foremost biblical scholars of our times says that being baptized by fire means that “we may be visited by a spirit of openness, generosity, that “the force” may come over us, carry us to do obedient things we have not yet done, kingdom things we did not think we had in us, neighborly things from which we cringe.” Being baptized in Spirit and fire inspires a belief that “God may act in us, through us, beyond us” and in greater ways “than we imagined.”

In other words, being baptized by Spirit and fire means that we live with a certain confidence, a holy hope, because even though we can’t imagine a brighter future, or better outcome, or even a distinct possibility,  we know that our very good God can. God holds out more than we ever imagined! It’s like that old hymn says, “I don’t know what tomorrow holds, but I know Who holds tomorrow!”

Baptism with Spirit and fire takes us beyond the limits of our own imaginations and opens us to the limitlessness of God’s. Baptism with Spirit and fire is the very essence of our faith that allows us to live with less fear and more trust, more courage, and more hope. More. Baptism with Spirit and fire allows us to get up off the couch and go up against the odds to work for peace and justice even in a world as divided, broken, and unjust as our own.

Next time you hear a voice from a closed mind – whether it belongs to someone else or even yourself, say, “Hey, sounds really nice, but somehow I just can’t imagine it ever happening!” You just tell that voice, “That’s okay, God can!”

Blessings of Peace and Love,
Mark

One of the first lessons of faith is also the hardest for me: There is a God, and I’m not it! Whether my heart is heavy with worry or sadness, or I’m burned out from the day-to-day grind, that’s when I have to remember this important rule more than ever. I’m not God, and not every load is mine to carry, at least not by myself. God is there to help me!

Come to me, all you who are weary and carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest.
– Jesus (Matthew 11:28-29)

What burdens are you shouldering right now? What’s weighing heavily on your heart or mind? Are you able to let it go or hand it over to God? Be still. Breathe deeply. And ask God to take it from here. Remember: God’s got this!

Love,
Mark

 

ARE YOU USING YOUR GOD GIVEN GIFTS AND TALENTS? Never be ashamed to share the gifts that God has given to you. They are unique to you. And they are yours and yours alone to offer. Remember, God has a divine purpose for them. That’s where joy is rooted!

Be the joyful blessing this year and always!
– Mark

BY THE TIME MY BROTHERS AND I WERE TEENAGERS, my parents were able to take  short vacations and leave us in charge of the house. We didn’t always take care of the place very well but knowing when they were due home, we managed to get the place passably cleaned up before they returned. The problem for us happened on those occasions when Mom and Dad decided to come home early. Yikes!

In a sense, Jesus has left us to be faithful stewards of the world, to take care of the earth and all who dwell in it until his return. And he said, Keep awake, for you do not know when the master of the house will come.

Check out this inspiring first-week-of-Advent message, House Sitter. It asks the questions: Are we living in fear or in hope? What would life be like if we lived as if faith wasn’t a requirement to receive God’s grace, rather a hope-filled response to having already received it?

What happens when parents leave the kids in charge? Living in hope, not in fear.